Mississippi History Now Mississippi Historical SocietySite ToolsSponsorsEditorial Advisory Staff
Back Home Lesson Plan

Beauvoir lesson plan

OVERVIEW

The last home of the only president of the confederacy, Jefferson Davis, is located on the Mississippi Gulf Coast. Due to its scenic location that faces the Gulf of Mexico, this elegant home was given the name Beauvoir, which means “beautiful view.” If houses could tell their own history, this national landmark would certainly have many stories to tell of its former occupants as well as stories of the survival of natural disasters.

CURRICULAR CONNECTIONS

Mississippi Studies Framework: Competencies 1-4.

TEACHING LEVELS

Grades 7 through 12

MATERIALS AND EQUIPMENT

  • Mississippi History Now article, Beauvoir
  • Chalk/chalkboard
  • Unlined paper

OBJECTIVES

The student will:

  1. Construct a timeline that shows the significant events in the history of Beauvoir.
  2. Compose an acrostic poem.

OPENING THE LESSON

The teacher will ask for student volunteers to answer the following questions:

  • How would you define the term historic landmark?
    (Buildings, districts, sites and structures where events of national or state historical significance occurred)
  • What historic landmarks can be found throughout our state? (If Beauvoir is not mentioned, the teacher can add this landmark to the list)
  • Why is Beauvoir an historic landmark?

The teacher will inform the class that they will learn about the history of one of Mississippi’s most well-known national historic landmarks today in class—Beauvoir.

DEVELOPING THE LESSON

Ask the students to construct a timeline that lists eight significant events in the history of Beauvoir that are mentioned in the Mississippi History Now article. Students can work alone or with a partner for this portion of the lesson. There may be a need to review with the students the process of creating a timeline. Students can also be asked to list national events that occurred at the same time on this timeline of Beauvoir history.

After the students have completed the timelines ask for student volunteers to share major events they have listed on their timelines. The teacher can draw a timeline on the chalkboard and allow student volunteers to come to the board to list their events. The teacher will lead a discussion of the history of Beauvoir as events are placed on timeline.

Students can continue to work alone or with a partner for this portion of the lesson. Students will be instructed to write an acrostic poem about Beauvoir. Remind the students that to write an acrostic poem, they will write the word Beauvoir vertically. Each letter will be used as a prompt to write a statement about the history and/or design of Beauvoir.

B reezes captured by the high ceilings and large windows
E
A
U
V
O
I
R

CONCLUDING THE LESSON

  1. Allow students to share their poems with the class. The poems can also be displayed in the classroom.

ASSESSING STUDENT LEARNING

  1. Class participation
  2. Timelines
  3. Poems

EXTENDING THE LESSON

  1. Students can research the process for determining a location as a national or state historic landmark.
  2. Students can research the locations of other national historic landmarks in Mississippi.
  3. Students can research the life of Jefferson Davis.
  4. Students can research the restoration process at Beauvoir after Hurricane Katrina.
  5. Students can participate in fundraising efforts to restore Beauvoir due to damage that occurred during Hurricane Katrina.
  6. Students can design a travel brochure for Beauvoir.
  7. Schedule a field trip to Beauvoir.
Back Home Back to Top Return to Feature

Mississippi Historical Society © 2000–2017. All rights reserved.